Meet Kostya Novoselov, the man behind the super-thin material graphene that could revolutionise medicine and technology

Written by admin on 06/07/2018 Categories: 老域名

Sir Konstantin ‘Kostya’ Novoselov at Monash University, Clayton. Novoselov jointly won a Nobel prize in 2010, after he isolated graphene. Photo: Eddie JimIt may centre on logic and physics, but Sir Kostya Novoselov is adamant on the unpredictability of science.
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After all, it was in a moment of experimentation outside their regular research that he and colleague Andre Geim made the discovery that would earn them a joint Nobel Prize in 2010.

Who knew that something so simple as using a piece of sticky tape to peel a layer from a block of graphite, then peeling the layer again and again to make it progressively thinner, would yield the holy grail in materials research, the single-atom-thick carbon substance called graphene?

Stronger than diamond, lighter than a feather, more conductive than copper, flexible and transparent – it would take the rejection of two papers before the scientific community believed what sounded too good to be true.

“That’s part of the reason why it [graphene research] spread so quickly across the world — you only need some good graphite and some sticky tape,” he told Fairfax Media.

The discovery came in 2004 but the next major breakthrough will be in how to produce it on a commercial scale and realise its seemingly magical potential.

Graphene’s super-thin, lightweight, flexible structure and highly conductive properties mean it is poised to revolutionise numerous sectors from electronics and energy storage to manufacturing and biomedicine. It’s graphene that will make wacky concepts like foldable, fast-charging smartphones and lightweight, energy-efficient aircraft possible.

“It might take five, 10, 15 years before we know how to grow it in large areas – although, we had the same feeling about isolating graphene 10 years [or so] ago and the progress since then has been really enormous,” Novoselov says.

In pursuit of its potential, the British government has funded two flagship graphene research centres to the tune of £121 million ($260 million) at the University of Manchester, where Novoselov and Geim are based.

Among the growing list of companies partnering with the centres are Samsung, Sharp, Huawei, Lockheed Martin, Rolls-Royce, GlaxoSmithKline, Siemens and Dyson.

But it’s Asia, home of consumer electronics manufacturing, and with most of the world’s graphite deposits in China, that is tipped to drive growth. A recent report put the Chinese graphene market at about $6.4 million, with compound annual growth at 95 per cent annually to 2020.

Some companies already dabbling: Samsung claims it has made longer-lasting batteries with graphene components, while a few Chinese companies are marketing smartphones with graphene touchscreens. It’s also being used in lightweight tennis racquets, and a University of Manchester spinout says it will be selling energy efficient graphene light bulbs soon.

But Novoselov isn’t moved by mere gadgets, or improving things we already make. He’s interested in making completely new things that only graphene or its composites make possible.

“Applications in bio- and life-science are the most interesting and most promising,” he says.

“We’re definitely going to see more and more nanomedicines being used, whether it’s sensors or drug delivery or artificial tissues.”

Because graphene can be made porous at the molecular level, it is set to have new applications in filtration processes and protective coatings. Think clean air and water like never before; houses that don’t corrode; packaging that preserves food much longer.

Australia is jostling for its position on this new frontier, with scientists countrywide researching applications for the material, and new explorations for graphite deposits.

The University of Adelaide has a graphene research group, and this week Monash University both opened a dedicated research centre and sponsored an international conference in Lorne, Victoria attracting some 250 graphene experts frome home and abroad, including Novoselov.

An Australian National University spinout, 2Dfab Innovations, is producing and exploring the uses of graphene in wearable technologies.

Novoselov can’t stress enough the importance of training in these new materials; for example, not just training today’s electrical engineers in how to work with silicon.

“The point is that it’s technology, and technology evolves,” he says.

“The only way you can compete is to maintain a healthy level of science in the country and then there is a good chance the next best technologies are going to be produced here.”

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The wine wars: Is cheap wine too cheap?

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The government’s tax review will determine whether rebates given to the wine industry should be allowed to continue. Photo: Jessica ShapiroWine Equalisation Tax rebate: a rort?
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The wine industry is at war with itself. In one corner are the mass producers of lower end table wines that led a cheap Australian charge on the world stage.

In the other, are the top end producers seeking to carve out a premium niche with the attendant price.

Passions run hot on both side sides as there are big dollars at stake and it will fall to the federal government to referee the stoush.

Bruce Tyrrell, a well-known Hunter Valley figure who is a fourth generation member of one Australia’s first families of wine, sums up the federal government’s choice on the wine tax debate pithily: “it would be a very brave government that would say, ‘I am going make cask wine more expensive and Grange cheaper’.”

He may well be right, but his views represent just one side of a debate that’s divided the industry.

The central issue is tax, although it collides with numerous others including the role of government support for an export industry worth $1.8 billion and employing more than 16,000 people across more than 2000 businesses as well as the basic economics of a massive supply glut that has put strain on all players. A divided industry

FARE believes any revenue gained by taxing wine based on volume should go back into drug and alcohol education programs.

The key, and hotly contested, question is whether wine should be taxed at a flat rate based on volume, rather than as a portion of its wholesale price?

This question pits lower-cost wine producers – who prefer paying a lower rate – against the premium-brand producers – who want the mass producers taxed harder.

In a market where 65 per cent of the wine bought in bottles retailed for less than $8, this is a fundamental question.

To demonstrate the depth of the split consider that Accolade Wines – which markets itself as the “world’s leading provider of new-world premium, commercial and value wines” (brands include Hardys and Jack Rabbit)and Wine Grape Growers Australia, which represent more than half of the nation’s 6200 grape growers, want the status quo. They’ve also got Cider Australia (which says that cider, as a fruit wine, should be taxed in the same manner as grape wine) in their corner.

They face off against the country’s biggest wine company Treasury Wine Estates (TWE). Its big brands include Penfolds, Wolf Blass, Rosemount Estate and Lindemans.

TWE is joined by the other big premium brand winemaker, Pernod Ricard Winemakers, which heads the Jacob’s Creek, Wyndham Estate, and Orlando Wines brands.

Another advocate for change to wine taxing arrangements is the Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education (FARE), although its position somewhat differs from the wine companies. FARE believes any revenue gained by taxing wine based on volume, and ending industry rebates, should go back into drug and alcohol education programs. The wine companies say it should go to helping the struggling industry compete in the export market. Cheap wine gets taxed less

Currently, cheap wine gets taxed less than more expensive wine.

This Wine Equalisation Tax (WET) is a tax based on the value of wine and other fruit-based alcohol products, and applied regardless of the amount of alcohol in the product.

All other alcohol products like beer and spirits are taxed on a volumetric basis, with the amount of tax paid determined by the volume of alcohol within the product and the category of alcohol (for example full-strength packaged beer is taxed differently to spirits).

The tax paid per standard drink on a $13 cask of wine is 5¢. Compare that to bottled wine, which is taxed at 15¢ for a $15 bottle of wine, and almost $1 for a $50 bottle of wine.

Pernod Ricard says that for wines retailing at $12, Australia’s rate is more than 40 times higher than France, seven times higher than South Africa and almost five times higher than the United States.

It argues that a change, that would see margins squeezed for some players, would help solve the glut.

“It will have a real impact on forcing uneconomic producers to change their business model or leave the industry,” its submission to the tax white paper says.

Its submission suggests transitional support, and restructuring assistance, to help to winemakers and growers that want out.

Pernod Ricard estimates that at the proposed volume-based rate of $2.20 per litre of wine, the price of cask wine would rise on average by $1.70 a litre.

Such a rate would “not substantially” impact the price of wines sold between $6 and $15 a bottle, but it would stimulate production of premium wines retailing for $15 a bottle or more. Communities would be ‘decimated’

Managing director of Casella Family Brands (behind the Yellow Tail brand), John Casella. Photo: James Brickwood

Overall this would be “revenue neutral” for the government, it says, and will improve the image of Australian wines “damaged by an influx of cheap wine”.

Industry veteran Brian Croser is deputy chairman of Wine Australia, the government body responsible for helping grow the Australian wine market. But he spoke to Fairfax Media in a personal capacity, as the man behind the family wine companies, Petaluma and Tapanappa located in South Australia’s Piccadilly Valley. He says wine has always, and should always, get preferential tax treatment and he hates the idea of volumetric tax.

“A volume-based tax would decimate those communities in the Riverland and MIA,” he says, referring to the Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area in NSW.

Managing director of Casella Family Brands (behind the Yellow Tail brand), John Casella, also believes the issue has been exaggerated.

He says TWE and Pernod Ricard’s argument is that “wine needs to be expensive or no-one will buy it”.

“I mean please, what nonsense,” Casella says.

“If we want people to stop buying Corollas and instead buy Lexus, do we change the laws or do we change the way we market Corollas better? If industry wants people to drink better wine, it should promote it. I cannot believe the time that’s been wasted on this whole tax debate when we should be focusing on selling ourselves and our products to our customers and consumers overseas.”

But the chief winemaker for Jacob’s Creek, Ben Bryant, says the tax system is hurting its ability to do so. “​You have a tax structure that favours cheap wine… Unless you complement marketing with a fair tax system, you are not going to address these structural issues.” The end of an industry?​

South Australian Liberal Senator Sean Edwards. Photo: Daniel Munoz

Accolade’s submission by its chief executive John Ratcliffe suggests that an increase on the tax on wine “risks devastating the wine industry”.

He says four out of five bottles and casks of wine will increase in price if the federal government imposes a volumetric tax on the industry. “We would expect demand for [affordable] wines to fall dramatically given likely price rises – with significant negative economic impacts in regional Australia, particularly the River Murray related wine producing regions of South Australia, Victoria and New South Wales,” Ratcliffe says.

“The scale of the impacts in those regions would be similar in economic and social outcomes to the restructure of the car industry, with the additional drawback that regional residents have fewer employment options, forcing many to choose between unemployment and leaving the region to find employment, further damaging the already straining fabric of rural communities.”

The greatest impact of increasing the price of cheaper wine will be on pensioners and other battlers who would be forced to give up one of “life’s little luxuries”.

The Winemakers’ Federation of Australia – the national industry body for Australia’s winemakers – has chosen to stay silent (given its members are from both sides of the debate). Its chief executive Paul Evans told Fairfax Media it was a very “divisive” issue.

Wine Grape Growers Australia says that lifting the price of one type of alcohol is more likely to lead to a switch to the next available substitute rather than a reduction in consumption.

The major drivers of cheap wine isn’t tax, its submission says, but rather, retailer market power and promotions. It says the government needs to deal with such issues separately.

“A volumetric tax on wine would be regressive and discriminate against older and generally poorer consumers who would be most affected by the price increase, whereas consumers of luxury wines, generally wealthier, would make gains through price reductions,” it says.

Tyrrell says: “I see no reason why pensioners, who may have a glass of wine a day …should be hit.”

South Australian Liberal Senator Sean Edwards – himself a winemaker in the Clare Valley – says changing the way wine gets taxed is a “big benefit to multinationals and beer distributors” but not to “wine makers and Australian grape growers”.

He says those advocating for change to the way wine gets taxed “are just wage earners”.

“They don’t have family businesses which are generations old,” he says. “I hear the word rationalisation in this conversation all the time – but what does that mean in practice? It means receivers and managers get appointed … it means there is going to be a loss of assets for the industry. … How long before we have no vineyards left because of this rationalisation that the industry is talking about?​” The social consequences

In 2013-14, the Government raised $5.1 billion in alcohol tax revenue. Photo: Michele Mossop

The Australia Institute modelling shows that if wine were taxed in the same way as beer, an extra $1.4 billion in tax revenue could be raised each year.

The potential gain is measured both in terms of extra tax revenue, as well as social benefits that can be realised by reducing alcohol-related harm.

The 2010 Henry tax review – which had recommended a volumetric tax rate be applied to alcoholic beverages including wine – argued that it would raise the price of cheap wine, and thereby reduce the costs associated with alcohol abuse.

The Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education (FARE) submission says that the “current alcohol taxation system is illogical, incoherent and does not adequately recognise the extent of harms that result from the consumption of alcohol in Australia”.

It says the WET has contributed to wine being the cheapest form of alcohol available for sale, with some wine in Australia being sold for as little as 24 cents per standard drink and the majority of bottled wine (about 65 per cent) being sold for under $8.00.

“There is strong evidence to demonstrate that the lower the price of alcohol, the higher the levels of consumption,” its submission says. “The WET must move to a volumetric tax rate as a matter of urgency.”

In 2013-14, the Government raised $5.1 billion in alcohol tax revenue (via the tax on beer, spirits and other excisable beverages).

This is despite the economic impact of alcohol on the Australian community costing $14.3 billion, according to the FARE submission, which cites Marsden Jacobs Associates (MJA) research. That research found the total costs of alcohol harm in Australia would be easily in excess of $15 billion per year.

FARE says the alcohol industry has been quick to innovate and “take advantage of the perverse incentives offered by the current taxation arrangements”.

It says spirit-like products such as TriVoski or Divas Vodkat are examples of products that are produced to imitate Vodka, but are actually ‘wine-based.’

“Because these products are taxed under the WET and not at the higher spirits rate, they are able to be taxed as wine and sold at cheap prices,” FARE says. For example, a 750ml bottle of TriVoski containing 13 standard drinks can be purchased for $9.95, equating to 77 cents per standard drink. The cost to the consumer

‘Australians will be economically better off’, says FARE’s Michael Thorn.

FARE chief executive, Michael Thorn, says the WET is corporate welfare at its worst.

“It simply beggars belief that ordinary Australians continue to foot the bill for the significant health and social costs of alcohol, while the majority of wine producers are profiting from favourable tax arrangements that encourage production of cheap alcohol that we know is targeted at, and consumed by problem drinkers,” he says.

Thorn says the price increase for pensioners will be so minuscule that it will not make a difference.

“The vast majority of Australians will be economically better off by taxing wine in a similar way to the way we tax draught beer,” he says.

FARE cites research by Allen Consulting that shows that if the WET is removed and replaced with a volumetric tax rate of $13.03 per litre of alcohol, it would result in an increase in the price of cask wine of 24.7 per cent and a decrease in the price of premium wine of 3.9 per cent.

The research estimates the change would decrease consumption of cask wine by 26.2 per cent or 6.98 million litres of pure alcohol.

However, there would be a 5.1 per cent increase in premium wine consumption, equivalent to 2.2 million litres of pure alcohol, and a substitution towards premium wine from other alcohol types by 1.8 per cent or 0.23 million litres of alcohol.

Total alcohol consumption would drop though, by 2.6 per cent or 4.9 million litres of pure alcohol.

Accolade and Wine Grape Growers Australia says while overall consumption may fall, price rises of one product will not stop binge drinking. Both submissions rightfully argue that those determined to drink will simply move to another product.

Accolade says that education and targeted programs about responsible drinking would be a better response. Tough choices

Bruce Tyrrell sees ‘no reason why pensioners, who may have a glass of wine a day …should be hit.’ Photo: Emma-Jane Pitsch

With wine consumption in Australia already at a 50-year lows, the impact of such drastic change to a tax system that the industry has so long relied on, will be devastating for some players.

As various submissions to the tax white paper noted, wine grape prices have halved over the past 15 years. And the size of the industry has shrunk in value by almost 25 per cent between 2003 and 2012.

In 2014, 84 per cent of Australian wine grapes were produced at a loss. Exports, while improving in some core markets such as China, overall remain subdued.

That leaves a conundrum for the government. Do they kill part of the industry to benefit another? Do they do more damage than good by meddling with the tax system?

Pernod Ricard says “tough choices need to be made if Australia’s wine industry is to achieve its full potential”.

But Tyrrell says if the government changes the system that generations of winemakers have relied it, it will not only destroy them, but local tourism.

“There are 3 million tourists driven to the Hunter Valley every year,” he says. “The small wine makers are an incredibly important part of that. It’s very easy to be pragmatic sitting in an office in Melbourne, but look at the country towns that are growing- they all have a tourism aspect to them. We’ve got to be careful we don’t take that away.”

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Victoria’s deadly dealings with guns: A shooting every nine days

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Police at a house in East Bentleigh where a man was shot on October 30. Photo: Joe ArmaoMan fighting for his life after shooting in city’s west
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A person has been injured or killed by gunfire on average every nine days in Victoria so far this year.

Almost one in three shootings resulting in death and injury over the past 10 months  were concentrated in a small pocket in Melbourne’s outer north, a Fairfax analysis found.

October has been  the worst month for gun violence this year, with 11 incidents, including the ambush of a man who was gunned down in Bentleigh East on Friday morning and a man shot after a fight in the city’s west late on Friday night.

At least half of the eight fatal shootings this year were drug-related, the victims suspected or convicted traffickers, or  associated with some of Melbourne’s most notorious criminal networks.

The month’s violence came to a head this week, as police guarded the Bentleigh East victim in hospital  and a man slain in a drive-by attack on Tuesday was mourned by his family.

Rachad Adra, 54, was killed in a drive-by attack on his Thomastown home, and his family continued the traditional Muslim three-day mourning period of Azza on Friday.

The father of three had been sleeping with his youngest son, four-year-old Kareem, when at least six shots ripped through two rooms of their brick home, fatally wounding him and leaving the boy in a serious condition.

Police are investigating whether his older sons, who work in the family’s heating and cooling business, were the intended targets of the shooting.

The deadly shooting occurred in a triangle about 20 kilometres north of the city, which has Roxburgh Park at its northern point, Broadmeadows to the west and Thomastown to the east, and has been plagued by gun violence this year.

The triangle is part of the so-called Red Zone in Melbourne’s north-west, which Fairfax revealed this year had recorded unprecedented levels of firearm seizures.

The latest shooting, the 38th this year resulting in death or injury, was in a far quieter area for gun crime – Melbourne’s south-east.

A 21-year-old was shot in the chest during an ambush by three men who followed him home early on Friday. Paramedics were called to the South Road, Bentleigh East house about 6.30am.

Inspector Bernie Edwards said police believed three men in a light-coloured sedan followed the young man to his family’s home, before one got out of the car and opened fire.

The man’s family was “understandably distressed”, while neighbours were concerned by the incident, Inspector Edwards said.

“But there’s no reason for [neighbours] to be concerned at this stage,” he said.

One of them, Selena Fang, said her parents-in-law heard up to six gunshots and then silence.

Ms Fang said she hoped the attack had not been random. “I’ve got a two-month-old baby, it’s very scary,” she said.

The Andrews government moved this week to speed up proposed changes to firearm trafficking laws, amid fears the state was awash with guns that were easily traded and increasingly being used by low-level criminals for protection.

But Crime Statistics Agency figures show that the rate of crimes against the person involving firearms has been relatively steady since 2011.

In the year to June, 2015, handguns were the gun most used by offenders, and were used more than twice as often as shotguns, the next most popular firearm.

The rate of stolen firearms is also steady, but rural properties and gun shops are still considered vulnerable by police; a sports store was burgled in Seymour on Monday, with several firearms stolen. The store owner declined to comment.

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Westbury Steam Spectacular and the Truly Tasmanian Craft ExhibitionPhotos

Written by admin on 25/04/2020 Categories: 老域名

Westbury Steam Spectacular and the Truly Tasmanian Craft Exhibition | Photos Westbury Steam Spectacular and the Truly Tasmanian Craft Exhibition on Saturday. Pictures NEIL RICHARDSON.
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Westbury Steam Spectacular and the Truly Tasmanian Craft Exhibition on Saturday. Pictures NEIL RICHARDSON.

Westbury Steam Spectacular and the Truly Tasmanian Craft Exhibition on Saturday. Pictures NEIL RICHARDSON.

Westbury Steam Spectacular and the Truly Tasmanian Craft Exhibition on Saturday. Pictures NEIL RICHARDSON.

Westbury Steam Spectacular and the Truly Tasmanian Craft Exhibition on Saturday. Pictures NEIL RICHARDSON.

Westbury Steam Spectacular and the Truly Tasmanian Craft Exhibition on Saturday. Pictures NEIL RICHARDSON.

Westbury Steam Spectacular and the Truly Tasmanian Craft Exhibition on Saturday. Pictures NEIL RICHARDSON.

Westbury Steam Spectacular and the Truly Tasmanian Craft Exhibition on Saturday. Pictures NEIL RICHARDSON.

Westbury Steam Spectacular and the Truly Tasmanian Craft Exhibition on Saturday. Pictures NEIL RICHARDSON.

Westbury Steam Spectacular and the Truly Tasmanian Craft Exhibition on Saturday. Pictures NEIL RICHARDSON.

Westbury Steam Spectacular and the Truly Tasmanian Craft Exhibition on Saturday. Pictures NEIL RICHARDSON.

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North to hold netball try-outs

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LOOKING AHEAD: North Bendigo is preparing for the 2016 season.
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NORTH Bendigo is gearing up to hold its netball try-outs.

The Bulldogs will hold their senior netball try-outs at Superior Roofing Oval on:

Sunday, November 22 –5pm to 7pm;

Tuesday, November 24 –7pm to 8.30pm; and

Thursday, November 26 –7pm to 8.30pm.

For more information, contactTamara Gilchrist on 0427 471 595.

North Bendigo’s A-grade side was beaten by Colbinabbin by 21 goals in this year’s Heathcote District Netball Association grand final.

•Sandhurst senior netball try-out dates:

Tuesday, November 10 –6pm to 7.30pm;

Wednesday, November 11 –6pm to 7.30pm;

Sunday, November 15 –10 am to 11.30am if required.

• Loddon Valley league clubMitiamo is seeking netball coaches for its A grade, B grade, C grade, C reserve, 17-under and 15-under teams.

Expressions of interest to Jen Morison by Monday on0434 104 052 or via e-mail at [email protected]老域名出售

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Snake bite attention vital

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ADVICE: Director of Mount Isa Emergency Department Dr Ulrich Orda says residents should learn how to treat snake bites. Picture: Supplied Mount Isa Queensland Health professionals are urgingNorth West residents to learnhow to treat snake bites.
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Last week a four-year-old girl was airlifted to the Mount Isa Hospital and a man near Townsville died as a result of a snake bite.

Mount Isa Hospital Director of Emergency Dr Ulrich Orda said snakes weremore commonin the summer months in Queensland.

“The current drought conditions in much of Queensland also are affecting snake movementsand forcing them closer to human areas in the search for moisture and because their naturalprey gravitates to where the water is,’’ he said.

“So everyone needs to be aware we share the environment with a number of potentiallydangerous snakes and should know what to do if bitten.’’

Queensland is home to about 120 species of snakes, with about 65 per cent of those beingvenomous.

Dr Ordasaid Mount Isa Hospital’s emergency department had recorded 17 snake bite-relatedpresentations so far this year compared to 19 in 2014 and 14 in 2013.

If a snake bite or suspected snake bite occurs, health professionals urge the community to call 000 and apply pressure to the area.

Dr Odra said when bitten you shouldapply a firm bandageover the bite site, and then cover the entire limb using the same amount of pressure as a sprained ankle.

“Immobilise the limb using a splint. Any rigid object may be used as a splint,” he said.

“Keep the patient absolutely still and encourage them to remain calm.

“Also don’t wash residual venom off as it can be used as a sample to identify the snakeinvolved.’’

Queensland Ambulance Service acting clinical support officerMichael Porteradvised residents todownload the Emergency Plus App, which displays accurate coordinates to assist emergency services.

“If there is only one bandage available start bandaging where the bite mark is,” he said.“If there is more than oneavailable, start at the site (of the bite) and then start from the fingers or toes upwards.”

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Local news in brief

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WINNERS: Macarthur Street Primary School pupil Lucas Lang with runners-up Wil Barbary of Macarthur Street Primary School and Bryce Guest of Pleasant Street Primary. Prizes presented by David Tannard of Bicycle Centre Ballarat and Youth Resource Officer Leading Senior Constable Des Hudson. Co-winner Josh Drake absent. Pic: Contributed.PUPILS TALK ABOUTCYCLE SAFETY
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A group of Ballarat pupils have made it their objective to educate the region about safe cycling.

Tackling cycle safety, the students were asked to come up with ideas for a radio commercial as part of Safe Cycle Month.

Four potential scripts were then chosen to be professionally recorded with the overall winning script going on to be aired on local radio stations during the month of October.

This year Macarthur Street Primary School pupils Lucas Lang and Josh Drake took out the best scriptwhich addressed the key issues of staying alert, being bright, wearing the right safety gear and notifying an adult where they are going.

Coordinator of the initiative, Ballarat Youth Resource Officer Des Hudson said it was great to see young people involved in the creation of safety messages for other young people.

“Young people are targeted with a variety of safety hints and tips, but when it comes from their friends, sometimes it has a greater impact,” he said.

“Both boys did a great job working on their script together.”

Both boys received a new bicycle with helmets while their school won their own Blue Light Dance Party for all students in November.

Runners-up Wil Barbary and Bryce Guest also received helmets and drink bottles for their scripts.

BALLARAT RESIDENTS HAVE THEIR SAY ON END OF LIFE CARE

Local residents are being urged to have their say about services they want to support them at the end of their lives.

A public End of Life Care framework consultation session will be held in Ballarat on Wednesday November 4 between 1.30-4.30pm.

The session is open to all Ballarat residents who would like to contribute towards a new state-wide end of life framework.

Ballarat Health Services palliative care physician, Dr Greg Mewett welcomed the opportunity.

“Improving and getting the best end of care is everyone’s business, and everyone should be interested as we will need to confront this at some stage in our lives –we shouldn’t be afraid to talk about our options,” he said.

“We need to prepare for situations that arrive in advanced stages of illness, so that people have some control.”

A new discussion paper has been released and consultation will take place across the state over the next two months. Local residents interested in attending the consultation session on Wednesday or contribute via an online hub should visit 老站出售betterendoflife.vic.gov备案老域名

YOUTH INVITED TO HAVE THEIR SAY

Ballarat residentsare invited to have their on how young people shouldbe supported.

Earlier this month Minister for Youth Affairs Jenny Mikakos launched the discussion paper, What’s Important to YOUth?, which forms part of the next stage in the state government’s consultations to shape its new youth policy framework.

Young Victorians, parents, carers, local councils and private sectors are being urged to have their say in the discussion which looks at mental health, employment and education.

Once finalised, the new youth policy framework will improve outcomes for youth Victorians, particularly those who are disadvantaged ordisengaged.

To have your say visit consult.youthcentral.vic.gov备案老域名

NATIONAL YOUTH WEEK 2016 GRANTS OPEN

More than $180,000 in grants will be available to help celebrate National Youth Week 2016.

Applications for community organisations, local councils and schools to apply for the one-off grants to help them celebrate young people’s achievements in the communities are currently open.

Organisations will be able to apply for grants up to $2000 to support National Youth Week activities such as art shows andmusic concerts.

Application are open until November 13 and can be made at 老站出售youthcentral.vic.gov备案老域名/nyw

Thousands of young Victorians are expected to take part in the week long celebrations of young people aged 12-25 from April 8, 2016.

FUNDING FOR YOUTH PROGRAM

A BALLARAT youth program has received $73,555 in funding to help young people lead the planning and staging of live music and cultural events throughout the region.

The Andrews Labor government provided funds to Ballarat’s FReeZA Committee, Sonika on Friday to help continue the committee’s positive youth development opportunities in the community.

“By delivering youth-led, all-ages, drug, smoke and alcohol free events, young people learn about leadership and decision making, while gaining valuable skills and experience,” Member for Buninyong Geoff Howard said.

“The Sonika team organise a series of important youth programs and events including music workshops, gigs, the NXUS hip hop collective, and Sonic Air which engages young people in training for live-to-air radio with SYN FM and Voice FM.”

FReeZAprovides funding to local government and community organisations to support young people to run fully supervised events in their local area.

BALLARAT’S FOOD AND BEVERAGE ON SHOW TO THE WORLD

BALLARAT will be among a number of locations visited by 240 international delegates as part of Australia’s biggest ever inbound food and beverage trade mission.

The delegates from key growth markets including China, Indonesia, Malaysia, India,the Middle East and the US will visit businesses in Victoria in an effort to showcase the quality of the state’s produce.

The four day program involves visits to more than 80 companies where international buyers will have the chance to meet local industry leaders and build relationships,new partnerships and export deals.

“We’re not waiting for the world to come to us, we’re bringing leading businesses from the top growth markets right to our doorsteps,” Premier Daniel Andrews said.

LOST CAMERA HANDED INTO POLICE

Police are hoping for assistance from the public to help find the owner of a camera handed in to police at Bacchus Marsh.

It’s believed the Canon camera may have fallen out of a bag in the vicinity of Geelong Road in Bacchus Marsh and is damaged.

The memory card is still intact and features photos of wildlife, especially birds, and rural and coastal scenes and portrait photos of a man and woman of asian appearance.

Anyone who has information about the camera is urged to contact Bacchus Marsh Police Station on 5366 4500

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GALLERY: Carcoar Show – part 1

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Forecasts of showers did little to dampen the spirits of the attendees of the “Best little show in the country”.
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There were large amounts of entries across all events including the horse events, cattle showstock, whip cracking, shearing, wood chopping and more.

The Blayney Chronicle was in attendance to capture some of the great moments witnessed at the 2015 Carcoar Show. Check out our gallery of images from the day.

GALLERY: Carcoar Show – part 1 All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

All the action from Carcoar Show, “The best little show in the country”.

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Granite Town: Rock-solid great entertainment: Video, photos

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The good vibes, times and weather continued at Moruya’s Granite Town festival on Saturday.
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Granite Town: Rock-solid great entertainment: Video, photos Paul and Mia Johnston perform

David Pergola, Simon Barbieri and Luca Vettorello.

Elizabeth and Tepa Faletoese

Granite Town team members Michelle Rixon and Samara and Cody Wehmeyer.

Jeff, Jess and Ollie Afflick and Gabi McMahon.

Sabine Halemai, Lillian Lack, Ben Halemai, Katie Staker and Joel Paranthione.

Gypsy Jazz and James Wells.

Jaykie and Jodie Bull and Lily Berry.

Jacqueline Maddison and Joyleen Kitto

George Thompson, Nigel Brooking and Cat Boyes

Matt, Lara and Lily Alterator, Frankie, Tania, Brent and Julia Losanno and Mark and Rosie Shorter.

Louise McDonald, Vicki Gock and Sandy Stevenson.

Doug Coreau, Elinya McDonald, Joe and Lucy Williams and John Bourne.

Audrey, Regina and Anthony Knobel.

Yannick Halemai and Joanne, Grace and Olivia Faletoese.

Team member Adrian Eden

Simon Punch and Vanessa Barnes

Richard McLellan and Martha Heeren

Pat McMahon and Bailey Pepper

Rodney, Charlee and Tracey Phillips.

Sabrina Mallard and Julian and Nick Dunne.

TweetFacebookThe talented Grace O’Connor of Moruya sings a song of her own composition at Granite Town. Grace recently finished her HSC at Moruya High School.This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 老域名购买.

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Communist victims exhumed in Bali to stop their spirits disturbing villagers

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Ida Bagus Krenda, 96, who witnessed the execution of communists at Batuagung village in Bali in 1966. Photo: Dharma Jaya The bodies were not in their proper place according to Hindu belief and have now been given a proper cremation. Photo: Dharma Jaya
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Villagers supported the exhumation of the bodies of nine communists executed in 1966. Photo: Dharma Jaya

Remembering Bloody October

Ubud, Bali: As creeping censorship of politically sensitive issues by Indonesian authorities attracted international opprobrium last week, the bodies of nine victims of the 1965 communist purge were peacefully exhumed in Bali to stop their spirits disturbing the villagers.

The Balinese village of Batuagung has been troubled by a high suicide rate for no apparent reason in recent years and villagers reported paranormal sightings.

“A villager said he was just chatting with another man, but then he noticed the other man’s head had fallen off,” village head Ida Bagus Komang Widiarta said.

“A few times also, students at an elementary school were possessed.”

The villagers consulted a Hindu priest and a dukun (shaman), who told them the spirits of nine communists massacred in 1966 and buried in a mass grave under a road in Batuagung were requesting a proper cremation.

“The bodies were not in their proper place according to Hindu belief,” Mr Widiarta said. “Therefore the villagers came up with the idea to cleanse the area … from things that happened in the past. There is no political aspect to it, none. We have no prejudices against the victims. We believe our people and we want to cleanse.”

Up to 1 million people with suspected leftist leanings were killed throughout Indonesia in 1965 and 1966 in what the CIA described as “one of the worst mass murders of the 20th century”.

The tragedy remains highly politically contentious as many of the country’s military and religious organisations were implicated in the purge. Indonesian President Joko Widodo rejected the idea of an apology to victims’ families on the 50th anniversary this year.

A survivor of the 1965 killings, now a Swedish citizen, was deported in October after reportedly attempting to visit the grave of his father in West Sumatra and a student newspaper from a university in central Java that featured stories on 1965 was recalled.

The national tragedy and Indonesia’s failure to reconcile with its past made international headlines this week after the Ubud Writers Festival was forced to cancel sessions related to 1965 and other politically sensitive issues.

It was the first time the festival, billed as south-east Asia’s biggest cultural and literary event, had been censored in the 12-year history of the event.

Amnesty International issued a statement raising concerns about continued attempts by Indonesian authorities to silence public discussions and disband events related to serious human rights violations in 1965.

“These actions are a clear restriction of the rights to freedom of expression and assembly and must stop immediately.”

While the festival was preoccupied with handwringing over the censorship of the 1965 purge, the remains of nine of its victims were peacefully exhumed and cremated on Thursday in front of more than 200 family members.

The exhumation was attended by Ida Bagus Krenda, 96,  who witnessed the men being killed with swords and a wooden log in 1966, and still remembered the site of the graves.

Ida Bagus Ketut Siwa, the head of a sub-village in Batuagung, said the exhumation had been discussed for years.

“There were too many odd occurrences … Like the high rate of suicides, just in our banjar [community] we have 50 suicides by hanging. We can only start openly discussing the burial site after Gus Dur [Abdurrahman Wahid] was president and he cancelled the law that prevented people from discussing it. It was taboo for a long time for anyone to discus it.”

Mr Siwa said the spirits of the bodies could return to their resting place now there had been a proper cremation and the ashes thrown to the sea.

“Our intention is only to … save the Batuagung village.”

An all-day Pecaruan ceremony will be held on November 1 to cleanse the area.

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Granite Town lights up Saturday: video, photos

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Moruya’s Granite Town festival featured a parade down Vulcan Street and more entertainment at thevarious venues in the town.
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Granite Town lights up Saturday: video, photos Moruya’s Vulcan Street was awash with colour on Saturday with the Granite Town Parade.

Geoff Franks, Jim Turnbull, Sam Franks, Dylan Franks and Jazz.

Sophia Carver, Declan McPherson and Alexis Carver.

Isla and Isabella Jay, Morgan Davis and Tyler and Kade Cooper.

Jenson, Rowena, Harper and Chris Blewitt wait for the parade in Halloween mode.

Lindsay, Emma and Sarah Lassau.

Zoe Andy, Tyrah Nye, Paul Cook, Susan Donaldson, Paul Nye and Shane, Jeshan, Laela, Kadie and Jess Davison.

Brian and Nancy Dryburgh.

Ron Parnell, David Chatto, Jayden and Pauline Parnell, Lilly Chatto, Ethan Parnell and Josephine and Kaye Chatto.

Brett and Lilli Korman.

Val Byrne and Marie Kelly check out the previous night’s Riverlight floats.

Nathan, Kimberli, Jaxon and Xavier Eke.

Noel Burke and grandson Digby Immins.

Caroline, Jordan and Graham Frail.

Lucy Hanlon, Tabitha Beauchamp, and Sharyn and Samantha Hanlon.

Moruya District Auxiliary

Moruya SLSC

Moruya Public School musicians

Nature Coast dragon boaters

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National Day of Unity marchers stand up for refugees in Walk Together

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Celebrating diversity: Cultural groups came together for the National Day of Unity walk on Saturday. Photo: Dominic LorrimerA Sydney Muslim leader has spoken out strongly against the treatment of refugees as thousands of Australians walked around the nation in a big shout-out to support refugees.
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Ahmad Malas, of the Lebanese Muslim Association, told a Sydney crowd of about 600 that the current political  and public climate surrounding Islam made it increasingly difficult for Australian Muslims and others to feel welcome.

“We have had enough of hearing divisive language, so no more politics of fear, no more Team Australia, no more racist talk and no more shifting the blame to any community and holding it to account for the actions of the few,” he told a gathering in Prince Alfred Park, Surry Hills.

The crowd had walked along the footpath down Cleveland Street from Victoria Park chanting “Say it loud, say it clear. Refugees are welcome here”.

They were taking part in the Walk Together to celebrate diversity and respect for people of different faiths and backgrounds.

Some motorists tooted horns in support, others yelled abuse after being prevented from turning into side streets until the procession passed. Some residents came out on to upstairs balconies of terrace houses to clap and cheer support.

Organisers pointed out it was not a march or a rally but a walk, part of a National Day of Unity which saw walks in 25 other cities and towns and 14 mosques around Australia open their doors to the wider community as part of National Mosque Open Day.

The Sydney walk attracted a diverse crowd, including young women wearing head scarves and draped in the Australian flag. Others walked under banners proclaiming the Uniting Church, the Socialist Alliance, Grandmothers Against Detention for Refugee Children, and the Land Rights flag.

Politicians, including federal MPs Michelle Rowland(Labor, Greenway), Craig Laundy​ (Liberal, Reid) addressed the gathering while federal colleague Jason Clare (Labor, Blaxland) and the state Labor MP for Lakemba Jihad Dibwatched.

The star turn of the speakers was Najeeba​ Wazefadost​.

She was smuggled out of Afghanistan when she was 12 and came to Australia on an asylum seeker boat in 2000 and graduated a medical doctor 10 years later.

Holding her arms out wide she told the crowd: “I am the living of the benefits of giving refugees a voice and a symbol of hope.”

The crowd started cheering as she recalled being locked up on arrival “in a place the Australian government call detentions centres. Today I have a new terminology for this, we should call it a prison. We were locked like criminals for having down no crime our only crime was we wanted to seek protection.”

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Crowns reign at the track

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They call it the sport of kings but this year the racetrack will be overrun with queens and princesses as crown and tiara-inspired headpieces turn up as the biggest headwear trend of the season.
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Fashion experts are dubbing the crown the biggest headwear trend since the fascinator turned up en masse at the track in the early 2000s.

Like the feathered fascinator, whose popularity was driven by younger racegoers who preferred the more wearable headwear to skyscraper styles complete with poke-an-eye-out embellishments, the crown is equally user-friendly.

Melbourne milliner Natalie Bikicki says crown-inspired headpieces will be one of the most popular looks at the races over the coming weeks.

“It’s a very, very popular trend because it is so wearable,” says Ms Bikicki whose ready-to-wear and custom headpieces sell for between $400 and $1200. “It’s small and petite and it is limitless in terms of what you can wear it with.”

“It’s also very on trend. So a lot of the ladies have been requesting crowns especially after seeing them on the catwalks of the big international designers like Dolce & Gabbana and Elie Saab.”

Although more literal interpretations of crowns and tiaras will turn up at the track in gold, silver and embellished with crystals, Ms Bikicki likes to take a more “subversive” approach to the crown – fashioning hers from leather, latex and PVC.

“I like my crowns to be a little less traditional and I achieve that by working with more unusual materials.”

Sydney milliner Viktoria Novak​’s trackside crowns on the other hand look as if they have been plucked straight from the head of a “Roman or Greek empress”.

“Every second person we see at the moment wants a crown,” says Ms Novak. “They’re everywhere. They will definitely be dominating the racetrack this season.”

Ms Novak says she started creating her signature gold, silver and brass crowns for her bridal clients in 2013. But she says when TV presenter Sonia Kruger wore one of her crowns to the Golden Slipper last year it sparked one of the biggest racewear trends in recent history.

“Last year there was a little bit of demand for them but this year it’s just gone crazy. I think people are over the fascinator and flowers. And the other thing is, crowns can be worn over and over again and with so many different outfits.

“We focus on metal crowns in gold and silver and rose gold, which we consider to be quite neutral colours so they really can be worn with anything.”

Whereas Ms Novak’s crowns retail for between $300 and $3000, more affordable interpretations are turning up on the high street in stores such as Mimco, Asos and Target for as little as $30.

ASOS’ womenswear head of design, Aisling McKeffry, said its metal filigree leaf crown and floral hair garlands, which sell for between $40 and $60, have been their biggest sellers of  headwear this racing season.

Ms McKeffry said the popularity of crowns and tiaras can be attributed directly back to the Spring/Summer 2016 fashion shows.

“Tiaras were seen on the SS16 catwalks at the likes of YSL, while Moncler used floral garlands throughout.”

In terms of trends, she says “clean metal feels newest” right now.

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