High energy show: The Marvin Gaye Experience is hitting Thirroul and Nowra this month and is dedicated to one of Motown’s most enigmatic hit-makers.The Marvin Gaye Experience is hitting Thirroul and Nowra thismonth.
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Thishigh energy show dedicated to one of Motown’smost enigmatic hit-makers, is not to be missed.

The tribute show is an ode to one of the pioneers of Motown, singer-songwriter and producer Marvin Gaye.

Marvin Gaye helped shape the sound of soul music and is considered one of the greatest artists of all time, thanks to his hits What’s Going On, Heard It Through The GrapevineandSexual Healing.

Marvin Gaye was one of the most consistent and enigmatic of the Motown legends, with a career that exemplified the maturation of black pop and soul into a sophisticated form, spanning social and sexual politics.

The two-hour live tribute extravaganza features some of America and Australia’s most talented soul artists.

The 15 piece all star bandincludes Doug Williams (The Voice 2014) and Darryl Beaton (Jessica Mauboy’s music director) and will be joined on stage byArmondo Hurley (vocals),Simone Waddell (vocals),Kimi Tupaea (vocals),Noel Elmowy(keys),Victor Rounds (bass),Calvin Welch (drums) andSunil De Silva (percussion).

The Marvin Gaye Experience Tribute Show is on at the Shoalhaven Entertainment Centre on November 28 and Anita’s Theatre onNovember 7.

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THE winners certainly brought home the bacon at the Denman Football Ground on Saturday.
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But, the inaugural Denman Pig Races also attracted a big crowd – which put a massive smile on the event organisers and local charity, Denman Support Group of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

The idea was the brainchild of committee members Paul and Merry Freeman.

Under the watchful eye of race caller Kevin Kiley, from Noah’s Thoroughbred Racing Pigs, the brightly-coloured participants had locals and visitors alike squealing with delight.

“This is a hit everywhere we go,” Mr Kiley said.

“And, it’s good to see so many people here today.

“The champion pig is rewarded by being the first to pop its snout into a bowl of milk at the end of the challenging obstacle course.

“The circuit boasts ramps, hay bales, tyres and trigger gates.”

Favourite Porky No. 8 captured the first event on the card, the Goodwin Transport Handicap.

Other feature races included the Hunter Mutual Handicap, St Joseph’s Centenary Cup, Two Rivers Handicap, Coolmore Cup, Hollydene Estate Cup, Precious Pieces Pig Plate and That’s All Folks.

BRINGING HOME THE BACON: Porky No. 8 takes out the first race on Saturday, the Goodwin Transport Handicap.

Denman Pig Races: PHOTOS SQUEALS OF DELIGHT: A big crowd converged on the Denman Football Ground for the inaugural Denman Pig Races, which raised funds for the Denman Support Group of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

SQUEALS OF DELIGHT: A big crowd converged on the Denman Football Ground for the inaugural Denman Pig Races, which raised funds for the Denman Support Group of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

SQUEALS OF DELIGHT: A big crowd converged on the Denman Football Ground for the inaugural Denman Pig Races, which raised funds for the Denman Support Group of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

SQUEALS OF DELIGHT: A big crowd converged on the Denman Football Ground for the inaugural Denman Pig Races, which raised funds for the Denman Support Group of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

SQUEALS OF DELIGHT: A big crowd converged on the Denman Football Ground for the inaugural Denman Pig Races, which raised funds for the Denman Support Group of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

SQUEALS OF DELIGHT: A big crowd converged on the Denman Football Ground for the inaugural Denman Pig Races, which raised funds for the Denman Support Group of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

SQUEALS OF DELIGHT: A big crowd converged on the Denman Football Ground for the inaugural Denman Pig Races, which raised funds for the Denman Support Group of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

SQUEALS OF DELIGHT: A big crowd converged on the Denman Football Ground for the inaugural Denman Pig Races, which raised funds for the Denman Support Group of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

SQUEALS OF DELIGHT: A big crowd converged on the Denman Football Ground for the inaugural Denman Pig Races, which raised funds for the Denman Support Group of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

SQUEALS OF DELIGHT: A big crowd converged on the Denman Football Ground for the inaugural Denman Pig Races, which raised funds for the Denman Support Group of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

SQUEALS OF DELIGHT: A big crowd converged on the Denman Football Ground for the inaugural Denman Pig Races, which raised funds for the Denman Support Group of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

SQUEALS OF DELIGHT: A big crowd converged on the Denman Football Ground for the inaugural Denman Pig Races, which raised funds for the Denman Support Group of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

SQUEALS OF DELIGHT: A big crowd converged on the Denman Football Ground for the inaugural Denman Pig Races, which raised funds for the Denman Support Group of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

SQUEALS OF DELIGHT: A big crowd converged on the Denman Football Ground for the inaugural Denman Pig Races, which raised funds for the Denman Support Group of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

SQUEALS OF DELIGHT: A big crowd converged on the Denman Football Ground for the inaugural Denman Pig Races, which raised funds for the Denman Support Group of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

SQUEALS OF DELIGHT: A big crowd converged on the Denman Football Ground for the inaugural Denman Pig Races, which raised funds for the Denman Support Group of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

SQUEALS OF DELIGHT: A big crowd converged on the Denman Football Ground for the inaugural Denman Pig Races, which raised funds for the Denman Support Group of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

SQUEALS OF DELIGHT: A big crowd converged on the Denman Football Ground for the inaugural Denman Pig Races, which raised funds for the Denman Support Group of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

SQUEALS OF DELIGHT: A big crowd converged on the Denman Football Ground for the inaugural Denman Pig Races, which raised funds for the Denman Support Group of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

SQUEALS OF DELIGHT: A big crowd converged on the Denman Football Ground for the inaugural Denman Pig Races, which raised funds for the Denman Support Group of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

SQUEALS OF DELIGHT: A big crowd converged on the Denman Football Ground for the inaugural Denman Pig Races, which raised funds for the Denman Support Group of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

SQUEALS OF DELIGHT: A big crowd converged on the Denman Football Ground for the inaugural Denman Pig Races, which raised funds for the Denman Support Group of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

SQUEALS OF DELIGHT: A big crowd converged on the Denman Football Ground for the inaugural Denman Pig Races, which raised funds for the Denman Support Group of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

SQUEALS OF DELIGHT: A big crowd converged on the Denman Football Ground for the inaugural Denman Pig Races, which raised funds for the Denman Support Group of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

SQUEALS OF DELIGHT: A big crowd converged on the Denman Football Ground for the inaugural Denman Pig Races, which raised funds for the Denman Support Group of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

SQUEALS OF DELIGHT: A big crowd converged on the Denman Football Ground for the inaugural Denman Pig Races, which raised funds for the Denman Support Group of the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service.

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Rainbow shining through the rain |PHOTOS It was hard to miss the explosion of colour travelling down Macquarie Street to Ollie Robbins Oval for Dubbo’s first Pride March. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH
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It was hard to miss the explosion of colour travelling down Macquarie Street to Ollie Robbins Oval for Dubbo’s first Pride March. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

It was hard to miss the explosion of colour travelling down Macquarie Street to Ollie Robbins Oval for Dubbo’s first Pride March. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

It was hard to miss the explosion of colour travelling down Macquarie Street to Ollie Robbins Oval for Dubbo’s first Pride March. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

It was hard to miss the explosion of colour travelling down Macquarie Street to Ollie Robbins Oval for Dubbo’s first Pride March. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

It was hard to miss the explosion of colour travelling down Macquarie Street to Ollie Robbins Oval for Dubbo’s first Pride March. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

It was hard to miss the explosion of colour travelling down Macquarie Street to Ollie Robbins Oval for Dubbo’s first Pride March. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

It was hard to miss the explosion of colour travelling down Macquarie Street to Ollie Robbins Oval for Dubbo’s first Pride March. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

It was hard to miss the explosion of colour travelling down Macquarie Street to Ollie Robbins Oval for Dubbo’s first Pride March. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

It was hard to miss the explosion of colour travelling down Macquarie Street to Ollie Robbins Oval for Dubbo’s first Pride March. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

It was hard to miss the explosion of colour travelling down Macquarie Street to Ollie Robbins Oval for Dubbo’s first Pride March. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

It was hard to miss the explosion of colour travelling down Macquarie Street to Ollie Robbins Oval for Dubbo’s first Pride March. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

It was hard to miss the explosion of colour travelling down Macquarie Street to Ollie Robbins Oval for Dubbo’s first Pride March. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

It was hard to miss the explosion of colour travelling down Macquarie Street to Ollie Robbins Oval for Dubbo’s first Pride March. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

It was hard to miss the explosion of colour travelling down Macquarie Street to Ollie Robbins Oval for Dubbo’s first Pride March. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

It was hard to miss the explosion of colour travelling down Macquarie Street to Ollie Robbins Oval for Dubbo’s first Pride March. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

It was hard to miss the explosion of colour travelling down Macquarie Street to Ollie Robbins Oval for Dubbo’s first Pride March. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

It was hard to miss the explosion of colour travelling down Macquarie Street to Ollie Robbins Oval for Dubbo’s first Pride March. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

It was hard to miss the explosion of colour travelling down Macquarie Street to Ollie Robbins Oval for Dubbo’s first Pride March. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

It was hard to miss the explosion of colour travelling down Macquarie Street to Ollie Robbins Oval for Dubbo’s first Pride March. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

It was hard to miss the explosion of colour travelling down Macquarie Street to Ollie Robbins Oval for Dubbo’s first Pride March. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

It was hard to miss the explosion of colour travelling down Macquarie Street to Ollie Robbins Oval for Dubbo’s first Pride March. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

It was hard to miss the explosion of colour travelling down Macquarie Street to Ollie Robbins Oval for Dubbo’s first Pride March. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

It was hard to miss the explosion of colour travelling down Macquarie Street to Ollie Robbins Oval for Dubbo’s first Pride March. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

It was hard to miss the explosion of colour travelling down Macquarie Street to Ollie Robbins Oval for Dubbo’s first Pride March. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

It was hard to miss the explosion of colour travelling down Macquarie Street to Ollie Robbins Oval for Dubbo’s first Pride March. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

It was hard to miss the explosion of colour travelling down Macquarie Street to Ollie Robbins Oval for Dubbo’s first Pride March. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

It was hard to miss the explosion of colour travelling down Macquarie Street to Ollie Robbins Oval for Dubbo’s first Pride March. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

Lucy Townend, Karley Townend, Ashley Townend, Jeff Ogden, Hayley Townend and Shilly Ogden. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

Paul Rich and Sarah Warren. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

Tania Wheatland and Bron Dowell. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

Stephen Lawrence and Matt Parmeter. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

Ana Tovey, Karen Payne, Kym Housden and Lauren Berkery. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

Renee Delaney, Katie-Lee Delaney and Jenny Baldosck. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

Sarah Upton, Michael Cluff, Lucinda Morrish, Carolyn Peebles and Tanya John. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

Jessica Jenkins, Cathy Jenkins and Nicholas Steepe. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

Josh Lawson, Steve Gilbert, Nicholas Steepe, Robyn Harman and Rob Stovell. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

Lyn Bridgeway and Jonas Ridge. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

Peita Buchanan, Ezra Bourke and Rhiannon Mason. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

It was hard to miss the explosion of colour travelling down Macquarie Street to Ollie Robbins Oval for Dubbo’s first Pride March. Photo: BROOK KELLEHEAR-SMITH

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Vegecareian Festival draws big crowd Vegecareian Festival at the Great Stupa. Pictures: CHRIS PEDLER
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A group of people head of on a tour of the Great Stupa.

Phuong cooks up some vegetarian dishes.

Snoopy, an 18 week old Great Dane, Wolfhound cross.

President of Jemima’s Gift Fran Heavyside with Snoopy, an 18 week old Great Dane, Wolfhound cross.

President of Jemima’s Gift Fran Heavyside with Snoopy, an 18 week old Great Dane, Wolfhound cross.

Claudia Scott with Shaun the Sheep and The Chicken.

Bendigo Animal Welfare & Community Services volunteer Liz Hill with Phantom, a Farrabella horse.

David Doyle at his stall.

Clare Cook and Eliza Cook from Sedgwick.

TweetFacebookThere’s plenty of good looking vegetarian food being cooked up at the #Vegecareian Festival at the Great Stupa. pic.twitter南京夜网/WChAISlGTH

— Chris Pedler (@TheAddyPedler) October 31, 2015Snoopy and Fran from Jemima’s Gift are at the Vegecareian Festival today. 1/2 pic.twitter南京夜网/ckz8HzWYhO

— Chris Pedler (@TheAddyPedler) October 31, 2015Snoopy and Fran from Jemima’s Gift are at the Vegecareian Festival today. 2/2 pic.twitter南京夜网/AZtjWbwr5g

— Chris Pedler (@TheAddyPedler) October 31, 2015This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.


Change: Mother Victoria Thomas with Ella, 11 months and Lacey, 2, wants changes to National Road Safety Laws for child restraint requirements.New research showsone-in-four West Australian parents is pushing toincrease the legal agelimit of children beingrestrained in car seats.
Nanjing Night Net

A study conducted bySlater and Gordon shows24 per cent of parentswould like their childrenstrapped into car seats forlonger than the lawrequires.

Esperance motherVictoria Thomas is one ofthose pushing for changeto the current legislation.

After surviving a seriouscar accident with hertwo daughters Lacey andElla – two and six monthsold respectively at thetime of the collision – MrsThomas has been pushingfor improvements to thelaw.

“Seeing the girlsunscathed made merealise how important it isto keep them in car seatsfor as long as possible,”Mrs Thomas said.

The Thomas familywere a few kilometresfrom their home whenthey were involved in a Tbonecollision.

“The doctor said ouryoungest child Ella wouldhave been seriouslyinjured had she been in aforward-facing capsule.

“We were well withinour legal rights to moveher by that age,” she said.

“It’s ridiculous that, ifit’s not safe for them to bein forward-facing capsulesat that age, and theevidence points to that,the law would allow otherwise.”

Suffering from a fracturedtailbone and ongoingmedical issues withher pelvis Mrs Thomaswas thankful her childrenwere in full harnessrestraints.

Slater and Gordonmotor vehicle accidentlawyer Tony O’Hurleysaid that motor vehiclecrashes were one of theleading causes of deathand acquired disability inchildren.

“In WA about 35 childrenaged six and youngerare killed or seriouslyinjured in road crashesevery year,” Mr O’Hurleysaid.

Bay of Isles Community Outreach servicemanager Kylie Ryan saidusing the wrong restraintscould be even more hazardousin the case of anaccident.

“We should alwaysseek feedback from parentsand see what theythink is suitable,” MsRyan said.

“The laws and regulationsshould be based onthe size of the child, notnecessarily their age.

“From BOICO’s perspectivewe’d encouragepeople to be as safe aspossible to avoid the significantgrieving and traumawhich could comefrom a child being injuredor killed in an accident.”

Esperance PoliceDetective Sergeant DarrylNoye said most parents inEsperance were doing theright thing.

“Parents need to beaware of the laws and thetypes of restraints neededfor their children,” he said.

“There will always bethe minority who can’tafford the adequaterestraints, or who refuseto comply with the law,but we book far moredrivers and adult passengersfor not wearing seatbelts than we do for childrenbeing unrestrained ina vehicle.”

Mrs Thomas wouldlike to see the age limit forcar seats be moved fromseven to at least nine.

“No one foreseesbeing in a serious accident,but when it comes toyour child’s safety – a carseat will save their life,”she said.

“It’s about education;you can’t be complacentwhen it comes to safety.”

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