Power-lifter Scott Hall has used an old-school training regime to gain impressive results. Picture: Peter StoopMOST days Scott Hall cranks up the heavy metal on the stereo and pumps some serious iron.
Nanjing Night Net

Inside a simple garage gym owned by friend Richard Hozjan in Hamilton North, the Lambton power-lifter undergoes a training regime he describes as “old school”.

After just one year, that training routine is delivering results.

Next month the 37-year-old will travel to Luxembourg for the World Powerlifting Championships after he was nominated as Powerlifting Australia’s representative.

Hozjan was also planning to compete in Luxembourg but withdrew due to a torn quad.

Hall earned that endorsement when he won the Australian Equipped Championships in July at Wests Mayfield by lifting 852.5 kilograms in the 120kg weight division.

Powerlifting involves three disciplines, squat, bench press and dead lift.

Each competitor has three attempts in each discipline and the best scores are tallied.

Hall is eyeing off a score in Luxembourg of 900kg, which he has achieved regularly in training.

“In my squat I’m hoping for anything over 375kg, bench would be around 220kg and my dead lift would be 320kg to 345kg,” Hall told the Newcastle Herald.

“Depending on how I go there, that should take me to over 900.

“I’m hitting every one I want to do in training at the moment.

“Everything is going all right, but it’s one of those things that you need to do it on the day.

“There’s a lot of preparation, but then there’s the travel over there, and I don’t know how that’s going to affect me and nerves as well.”

Even if Hall reaches his goal of 900kg in competition, it will not be in the same ball park as the world’s best, who are expected to lift 1200kg.

American Blaine Sumner holds the world record of a thigh-burning 485kg in the squat, and many are predicting he could break 500kg in Luxembourg.

“The big guy that everyone wants to see is Blaine Sumner,” Hall said.

“They’re talking about him squatting 500kg.

“It would be the first time anyone has ever squatted 500kg, so that will be the big drawcard for the event.”

Keeping his 135kg body fuelled for power-lifting is almost a full-time job for Hall.

His diet would give even the largest family’s shopping list a shake.

“I’d eat 300 grams of meat and the same in potatoes and do that three or four times a day, and I’m also snacking throughout the day,” he said.

“Especially now, because it’s pretty intense training at the moment.

“It’s not like that all the time, but because I’m training so hard and lifting heavy weights constantly, you’ve got to keep the food up because you’re constantly hungry.”

Even before making his debut at the world titles, Hall is already making long-term plans to return on the global stage.

“I want to go again next year if I can qualify again,” he said.

“I just want to keep getting higher totals and keep chasing the big boys down.”


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