Police warn of stranger danger this Halloween

Written by admin on 19/07/2019 Categories: 南京夜网

POLICE warned parents and children of stranger danger this Halloween.
南京夜网

In a statement on social media on Friday, Tasmania Police said while Halloween was fun for everyone, it was important to keep a close eye on minors.

“Mums and dads please, do not let your little ghosts and ghouls go out trick or treating by themselves,” police said.

“Little goblins and gremlins please do not enter any strangers’ houses regardless of the treats offered.”

Police have reminded kids to be mindful of any suspicious behaviour over the weekend.

“Please pay attention to your surroundings; stay in well lit, well known areas. Do not go off the beaten track by yourselves. Stay in groups together.

“Remember that not everyone participates in Halloween activities and some of your neighbours may have signs on their doors. Look before you knock; and always check with your responsible Witch or Munster before you proceed.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 南京夜网.

Comments Off on Police warn of stranger danger this Halloween

War cemetery to bloom with new roses

Written by admin on  Categories: 南京夜网

War cemetery to bloom with new roses After viewing the upgrade, Wayne Pasche said the rose beds were still a work in progress.
南京夜网

Councillors Leon Stephens and Mick Hopgood are eager to see new roses at the Port Pirie war cemetery in full bloom

TweetFacebookThe Recorderspoke to Wayne Pasche about the dishevelled state of the rose beds where his parents were.

Ninety roses have been planted across two rose beds with drip lines to ensure the flowers will remain vibrant.

“Hopefully we get something out of this season, but they’ll definitely look good next season,” said parks and recreation supervisor Allan Henderson.

Councillor Mick Hopgood saidthe timing was fitting as it coincided with the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II as well as marking 100 years since the Gallipoli landing.

“There is 45 roses in either flower bed, which symbolises 1945 – the year that World War II ended,” Cr Hopgood said.

Wayne Pasche, on viewing the upgrade said, “It’s still a work in progress. When the roses are blooming it will look a lot better.”

“I appreciate the effort,” he said.

“My mother was a great gardener and she would appreciate a well-kept garden to represent her grave.”

Council’s infrastructure director, Kathryn Johnson, said they recognised the importance of maintaining cemeteries to a high standard to meet community expectations.

“Works are continuing to maintain our cemeteries as a place of respect and reflection,” she said.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 南京夜网.

Comments Off on War cemetery to bloom with new roses

Weather favours the show

Written by admin on  Categories: 南京夜网

Resting: Having a break while competing in the Warrnambool Romney Shears competition are Floyd Neil, Jamie Bryant, David Buick and Dean Ball. Trying their luck: Isabella Robertson, and Sommer and Holly Jones, all of Mortlake try their luck at Pluck a Duck.
南京夜网

THE storm passed and the sunshine returned to attract good crowds to the Warrnambool Show on the weekend.

Clare Price in action.

An early Saturday morning downpour dropped up to 25 millimetres of long-awaitedrain in areas surrounding Warrnambool and put smiles on the faces of many of the farmers in the show crowd.

Placing: Jack Beaton and Jacob Scott, from Cobrico Holsteins, with their cow that won second place in the two years interbreed section.

Apart from the fine weather, the scrapping of admission fees for primary school children also brought more families through the gate.

The show committee this year called for the Warrnambool community to show its support for the event and reverse declining attendances and committee member Alistair Ross was hopeful that had occurred.

Clobbered: Mia Delaney, of Mortlake, clobbers her dad Leigh with the inflatable baseball bat she won at a show attraction.

Mother ofsix young children,Mandy Speed of Warrnambool, said the scrapping of admission fees was much appreciated by her family, who enjoyed the show rides and dagwood dogs.

The show is a lively blendof entertainment and agriculture with the Warrnambool Romney Shears competitiondrawing together both thoseelements with its fast-paced action.

Ready to shake: Amber Couch, of Nirranda,and Lars Wignell, of Warrnambool prepare themselves for a lot of shaking on the Break Dance ride.

The competition, the biggest in the state apart from the state final, drew more than 100 competitors from throughout Australia and New Zealand, with the regular Aussies vKiwi battle again drawing strong interest.

Among those in the crowd were Melbourne mother Sonia Faukhauser and her two-year old son Harrison.

Ms Faukhauser said she grew up on a farm and she loved introducing her son to farm animals.

On parade: Krystal Blackmore, 5, of Hawkesdale, leads Aryshire calf ‘Dempsey Rose’ in the junior interbreed competition. Pictures: Everard Himmelreich

She said Harrison had been fascinated by the shearing.

Equestrian events at this year’s show were also well supported with about 400 riders competing over four days of events.

Equestrian event spokeswoman Julie Houlihan said competitor numbers were the best for a number of years.

Mrs Houlihan saidthe good numbers were likely to be due to many locals responding to the show’s call for support this year.

She said the 10am start this year for events on Friday and Saturday had also probably helped attract competitors from further afield.

Among those competing in the dairy cattle events on Saturday were Donna Edge of Carpendeit and her 15 year-old-daughter Cally O’Shannassy.

Ms Edge said she had shown cattle as a teenager and was pleased her daughter was continuing the family tradition.

She said showing cattle not only taught young people the proper treatment ofcattle, but was also great fellowship for them.

Saturday night wasa show highlight with a“Light the Night” walk at theshowgroundsto raise funds for the Leukemia Foundationand fireworks.

Weather favours the show Cally O’Shanessy and her mother Donna Edge of Carpendeit with one of the dairy cows they showed at the Warrnambool Show.

Keelie Sheppherd of Warrnambool with her bird that won the champion junior ribbon in the poultry section.

Kelvin Boyle with the 1953 Bedford truck he restored and exhibited at the Warrnambool show.

Erica Cole, on Ashtan Park Taylor Made, one of about 400 competitiors in the show’s equestrian events.

Amber Couch, of Nirranda, and Lars Wignell, of Warrnambool, get ready to shake on the Break Dance ride.

Isabella Robertson, and Sommer and Holly Jones, all of Mortlake, try their luck at Pluck a Duck.

TweetFacebookThis story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 南京夜网.

Comments Off on Weather favours the show

Eden Whale Festival 2015 off to a warm startPhotos

Written by admin on  Categories: 南京夜网

Eden Whale Festival 2015 off to a warm start | Photos Pindy Hoskins, Kodah Duarantie and Bruce Thomas are all smiles at the 2015 Eden Whale Festival on Saturday.
南京夜网

The National Parks and Wildlife Service’s “Walking Whales” were a hit with the crowd during this year’s Eden Motor Group Street Parade as part of the 2015 Eden Whale Festival.

Hanz the Juggling Chef takes centre stage on Saturday.

Spectators lined Imlay Street for a view of the Eden Motor Group Street Parade on Saturday morning.

Spectators lined Imlay Street for a view of the Eden Motor Group Street Parade on Saturday morning.

Tahlia and Kerrie Colarusso from Morwell at the 2015 Eden Whale Festival.

Eden’s Connor Beck gets into the Halloween spirit on Saturday.

Morrie Lynch, Jim Morris and Jon Gaul at the Eden Whale Festival on Saturday.

Eden’s David and Lorraine Squires take time out for a drink during the 2015 Eden Whale Festival.

National Parks and Wildlife Service’s Amy Harris and Barbara Allgaier and the “Discovery Booth” at the 2015 Eden Whale Festival on Saturday.

Spectators lined Imlay Street for a view of the Eden Motor Group Street Parade on Saturday morning.

Spectators lined Imlay Street for a view of the Eden Motor Group Street Parade on Saturday morning.

Spectators lined Imlay Street for a view of the Eden Motor Group Street Parade on Saturday morning.

Jon Billett and AJ Wiltshire from the Canberra Sea Shepherd chapter.

Jill Jarvis, Shirley McCamish and Sandra Symonds celebrate Halloween on Saturday.

Shoppers have a look over the selection at the Oyster Farmers of the Sapphire Coast stall.

Spectators lined Imlay Street for a view of the Eden Motor Group Street Parade on Saturday morning.

Spectators lined Imlay Street for a view of the Eden Motor Group Street Parade on Saturday morning.

Spectators lined Imlay Street for a view of the Eden Motor Group Street Parade on Saturday morning.

The Eden Area Gymnastics group put on a show for all at the 2015 Eden Whale Festival.

Hanz the Juggling Chef takes centre stage on Saturday.

Hanz the Juggling Chef takes centre stage on Saturday.

Hanz the Juggling Chef takes centre stage on Saturday.

Fred Silk from Gregs Flat works on his 1929 Plymouth after the drive to the 2015 Eden Whale Festival.

Spectators lined Imlay Street for a view of the Eden Motor Group Street Parade on Saturday morning.

Sapphire Coast Historical Vehicles Club member John Ronan of Tura Beach in his all original 1965 Valiant at the 2015 Eden Whale Festival.

1950s Americana takeaway at the 2015 Eden Whale Festival.

The Eden Area Gymnastics group put on a show for all at the 2015 Eden Whale Festival.

Ian Lobley in his 1978 Cadillac enjoys the 2015 Eden Whale Festival.

The Eden Area Gymnastics group put on a show for all at the 2015 Eden Whale Festival.

An Eden Area Gymnast captured in mid-tumble.

An Eden Area Gymnast captured in mid-tumble.

The National Parks and Wildlife Service’s “Walking Whales” were a hit with the crowd during this year’s Eden Motor Group Street Parade as part of the 2015 Eden Whale Festival.

The National Parks and Wildlife Service’s “Walking Whales” were a hit with the crowd during this year’s Eden Motor Group Street Parade as part of the 2015 Eden Whale Festival.

TweetFacebookThis story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 南京夜网.

Comments Off on Eden Whale Festival 2015 off to a warm startPhotos

Girls’ Night at the ‘Boob

Written by admin on  Categories: 南京夜网

Cyclist Shane Crawford was riding through Burra in July 2013and Heather Davy was there raising awareness and fundsfor breast cancer.
南京夜网

She had arranged for women in the region to hang as many bras as they could along a fence.

“That was the same day I felt a lump in my breast,” she said.

“It was aggressivestage three breast cancer, and 3.5 weeks later I had an operation.”

Tonight in Booborowie, Heather is hosting a Girls’ Night Inand is expecting more than 100guests.

“I’ve always been passionate about this, and events like this are important because it gives people the chance to talk about what they’re going through and find support.”

This will be the second Girls’ Night In that Heather has hosted, with the last one in 2013 raising more than $4000.

Tonight’s event starts at 7:30pm at the Booborowie Hall.

Entry is $10, with plenty of games and crooner Danny Hooper will be there for entertainment.

Get the girls together for what is sure to be a late night!

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 南京夜网.

Comments Off on Girls’ Night at the ‘Boob

A man seated next to his doppelganger on a flight from London

Written by admin on 19/06/2019 Categories: 南京夜网

Thomas Douglas found his doppelganger seated next to him on a flight to Galway. Photo: TwitterTwo ginger-bearded strangers seated next to each other on a plane experienced a strange phenomenon.
南京夜网

Thomas Douglas was headed to Galway on a flight from London’s Stansted when he found himself settling in a seat right next to a man that could have been his twin, LBC reports.

“I asked him to move and when the guy looked up, I thought: “Holy s***, he looks like me” Douglas toldThe Daily Mail.

Ecstatic at finding a familiar face to share the ride with, Douglas took a selfie to commemorate the occasion.

Lee Beatie, a friend of Douglas’ wife, posted the picture to social media, where it attracted viral attention.

“Guy on right is the husband of my friend. Guy on left is a STRANGER he met on a flight last night!” Beatie tweeted.

“I can’t stop looking at it. They are the same man.”

Apparently, the freaky Friday moment didn’t stop there, with Douglas arriving in the Irish city to find his twin checking into the same hotel.

“I later checked into my hotel in Galway to find my doppelganger checking into the same hotel ahead of me…We ended up socialising and quite a few people pointed out that we looked very similar.” Douglas added.

Comments Off on A man seated next to his doppelganger on a flight from London

Time out in the Shoalhaven: social photos

Written by admin on  Categories: 南京夜网

Time out in the Shoalhaven: social photos Enjoying good food and wine at Cupitt’s Winery and Restaurant.
南京夜网

Mikaela Irwin, Emily Quinn, Caterina Loccisano and Charms Baltis at Shoalhaven City Turf Club for the annual Mollymook Cup.

Craig Noble, Abbey Noble, Marissa Newman and Jay Martin at Shoalhaven City Turf Club for the annual Mollymook Cup.

Greg Houghton, Amy Houghton and Jaimie McLean at Shoalhaven City Turf Club for the annual Mollymook Cup.

Back: Jill Hart and Rod Wells. Front: Gabrielle Heanes, Pam Heanes, Lorna Duncombe and James Welsh at Shoalhaven City Turf Club for the annual Mollymook Cup.

Back: Gary McVey and Shane McVey. Front: Beverley Clee, Narelle Beauchamp and Bernadette Murphy at Shoalhaven City Turf Club for the annual Mollymook Cup.

Bev Mcvey, Debbie Hayden and Sarah Hopkins at Shoalhaven City Turf Club for the annual Mollymook Cup.

John McGuire, Rachel McGuire, Beck Crees and Chris Dell at Shoalhaven City Turf Club for the annual Mollymook Cup.

Rodney and Andrea Tucker at Shoalhaven City Turf Club for the annual Mollymook Cup.

Renee Menzies, Tony Cottam and Joanne menzies at Shoalhaven City Turf Club for the annual Mollymook Cup.

Toby, Layla and Jodie Madge at Shoalhaven City Turf Club for the annual Mollymook Cup.

Jan Berthon and Anne Wicks at Shoalhaven City Turf Club for the annual Mollymook Cup.

Theresa Ng and Dianne Maguire at Shoalhaven City Turf Club for the annual Mollymook Cup.

The delicious donut eating competition at the St Mary’s Star of the Sea Primary School fete.

Celia Van Ingen at the St Mary’s Star of the Sea Primary School fete.

The giant slide was a big hit at the St Mary’s Star of the Sea Primary School fete. Photo: Dean Dampney

Joby Hendrix at the St Mary’s Star of the Sea Primary School fete.

Leif Dampney enjoyed being shown how to put out fires by Dominique Toldi at the St Mary’s Star of the Sea Primary School fete.

Ann-Marie Wilson at the St Mary’s Star of the Sea Primary School fete.

Simon Kinch at the St Mary’s Star of the Sea Primary School fete. Photo: Dean Dampney

Martha Perry and Karynne Treweeke at the St Mary’s Star of the Sea Primary School fete. Photo: Dean Dampney

Ellie Fitzpatrick at the St Mary’s Star of the Sea Primary School fete. Photo: Dean Dampney

Simon Kinch, a year two teacher, getting smashed in the face by a wet sponge, at the St Mary’s Star of the Sea Primary School fete. Photo: Dean Dampney

Rhiannon Perry (left) and daughters Ruby Coller and Lilly Macey with artist Laura Perry during her ARTfest exhibition at Little Gunya.

Jason and Sally Winsbury with their children, Lara and Erin enjoy the Shutterspeed photography competition for ARTfest.

Katie and Scottie King admire the youth 8×8 entries on display during the Milton Gallery walk for ARTfest.

Paris Lees and Laura Katsoulis, wearing costumes seen in movies such as Mad Max, entertained in the window of AKWA for ARTfest.

uy Turk and Stevino Vinetti celebrated Coffee Guild’s first birthday during the gallery walk, with free coffee and live music for ARTfest.

Simon Grace provided the enthusiastic crowd with a spectacular opening set before the Milton Pechakucha night for ARTfest.

Vikki Sansom with Ebony and Austen Beadon check out the amazing art on display at the 8×8 exhibition for ARTfest.

Some of the little houses, made by local school students, that made up a miniature village on display in Milton’s Anzac Park for ARTfest.

Lynne Hille (left), Helena Baker, Kerry Todman and Richard Austen took in all the sights and sounds of the Milton Gallery Walk for ARTfest.

Quite Like Pete, Ian Tennant, Sam Boland, Shaun Riley and Mitchel Berwick entertained during the Milton Gallery Walk for ARTfest.

Tim Johnson from XFIRE Music showed off some music skills at the On Stage concert to support mental health.

Some of the crew behind the Milton Ulladulla Song film clip which was screened at the On Stage show for mental health.

Judy Samuelson and Rita Sinclair at the last official luncheon of the Mollymook CWA.

Gwen Brown, Fiona Wadsworth and Velma Walker at the last official luncheon of the Mollymook CWA.

Joan Clark and Jan Sherwood at the last official luncheon of the Mollymook CWA.

Joan Lond and Joan Clark at the last official luncheon of the Mollymook CWA.

Iris Crooks, Ann McDonald and Pat Dockett at the last official luncheon of the Mollymook CWA.

Bethany Wells, Frida Contor and Astrid Alderman at the last official luncheon of the Mollymook CWA.

TweetFacebookThis story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 南京夜网.

Comments Off on Time out in the Shoalhaven: social photos

Johnny Cash tribute is back

Written by admin on  Categories: 南京夜网

CASH TRIBUTE: Hear the smooth sound of Daniel Thompson at Johnny Cash The Concert.
南京夜网

Johnny Cash The Concert is back in Port Pirie on Friday, November 13, bigger and better than ever before and celebrating 60 years since the release of his first single.

The individual genre of music including 1500 songs has been said to be an unparalleled body of work and is being brought back to life through the concert.

Award-Winning singer Daniel Thompson (Cash) has been starring in the show since 2009 and said after six years he is still loving the opportunity to pay tribute to such a great artist.

“To be singing fantastic songs to people that want to hear it is great,” he said.

Daniel said he finds the songs challenging as a singer, and enjoys having such a vast audience that changes every show.

Noting the uniqueness of the music Daniel said, “It’s so hard to nail what it is about his music that people love.”

Come and be entertained by the classic hits of Johnny Cash coming up soon at the Northern Festival Centre.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 南京夜网.

Comments Off on Johnny Cash tribute is back

Goodbye, toilet paper: My experiment in generating no rubbish

Written by admin on  Categories: 南京夜网

Five months into the experiment, after some initial reservations, I gave up toilet paper.In the spring of 2010, on an episode of the radio show The Story,I heard the tale of a British couple who lived trash-free. I walked home from my laboratory at the University of Michigan and told my roommate Tim that I thought I could do better – I’d live trash- and recycling-free – and that I’d start soon. “No,” he said. “If you care about this, then you start today.” And just like that, I began an experiment in individual activism in the face of large environmental problems.
南京夜网

The average American produces more than four pounds of trash and recyclables per day, about 1500 pounds (680kg) per year. In my first year of living rubbish- and recycling-free, I produced a little more than 7 1/2 pounds (3.5kg) of waste, including receipts and miscellaneous paper, a couple of Ruffles chips bags and a few straws, stickers off of fruit, glass milk-bottle caps, a broken Pyrex dish, a broken milk bottle, one beer bottle and one plastic bottle. In year two, I made it down to six pounds – about 0.4 percent of the American average.

To get there, I knew I’d need to change the way I lived, and I’d need some parameters. Everything apart from food scraps (which I’d compost), toothpaste and soap (which were too difficult to recover), and toilet paper would count as trash or recycling. I’d collect my refuse – concert tickets, stickers, plastic tags, packaging, glass, you name it – and not throw it away.

I made a few exceptions. I couldn’t always control other people’s behaviour, so junk mail wouldn’t count as my own recycling. I wasn’t going to be a boor and instruct a dinner-party host on how to reduce his or her trash. And if someone gave me a gift – a token offered from the heart – I accepted it. Also, I was working on my aerospace engineering PhD in an experimental combustion lab, and my research required many single-use materials: Mylar, latex gloves, ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (milk carton material), optical cleaning wipes and so on. If I wanted to conduct quality research and finish my dissertation, I’d have to separate requirements inside the lab from my habits outside it.

All my rubbish for a year fit into two plastic bags. Photo: Domino Postiglione

I knew this experiment wouldn’t make a profound difference for conservation, but I felt I should do it because I had no excuse not to. Others don’t have the flexibility or the means for this kind of activism. Or they may simply have more immediate concerns. Consumption is so convenient that it is truly invisible and routine. I tried my best not be sanctimonious to people less committed than I.

I had to get creative. When a restaurant furnished a napkin-wrapped fork and knife, I asked the server to exchange them for cutlery without the napkin. I’d remember to say “No straw!” after asking for water and to make sure the veggie burger I ordered didn’t come with a wooden pick holding it together. I tried to think ahead. I carried a fork, a spoon, a plate and a bowl everywhere I went, just in case a student event served food but provided only plastic to eat with. I did what I had to, and sometimes it was awkward. At a house party (where the red plastic cup is king), I’d saunter into the kitchen, use a glass from the cupboard, and then rinse it and put it back when I was done. Five months into the experiment, after some initial reservations, I gave up toilet paper. Now I do things the way hundreds of millions (including my extended family) in India do – with water and my left hand.

In many ways, though, my life didn’t change much. I had grown up in a humble setting in India, where I was accustomed to consuming as little as possible. I was a member of the People’s Food Co-op in Ann Arbor, where I bought my produce unpackaged. Most of my waste came from food packaging, so anything I could do to limit it reduced my trash and recycling significantly. I bought bread from the bakery, gave up most cheeses and drank milk only when it came in reusable bottles. Even though I seldom bought new gizmos or clothes, I stopped buying them entirely for this project, because I knew creating them, transporting them and selling them at retailers generated plenty of upstream waste. If I thought I really needed something, like a new mug or hoodie, I’d wait a week before buying it. And then I’d wait another week. Turns out I never bought those things, which means I never needed them. I had enough already. Compared with the way so many others live, it wasn’t much of a hardship.

But sometimes even the best intentions couldn’t eliminate waste. Once, as I was opening a can of mango pulp that predated the experiment, the lid popped off and landed behind the fridge. When I reached blindly for it, I cut a smooth, deep gash in my finger and used Band-Aids to stanch the blood. Even more painful was the moment during Christmas break in 2010 when my parents, who live in Pennsylvania, decided to change the mobilephone plan they shared with me. A new plan meant a new phone. After two hours spent trying to persuade Verizon to let me keep my old flip phone or trade it for a used one, I gave up. I got a new phone that winter, the flip phone I still use. But the old one would probably still function fine.

Then there were the times I gladly indulged. During the summer of 2010, a chain-smoking Romanian man sponsored some experiments in our lab. He’d come around to help run them every now and then. A great World Cup match was about to start one day, and, learning that all of us in the lab were going to watch it, he asked us where he could find a vending machine. A few minutes later, he came back with 12 bags of potato chips, a couple for each of us. “Screw the experiments this afternoon,” he told us. “Let’s eat some junk and watch some football.” I enjoyed those chips.

The hardest part was figuring out the best way to talk about what I was doing. It is important to speak to people in a language they understand – a language that respects where they come from, their motivations, their upbringings. This was crucial because I was constantly asked to explain myself at restaurants, in social gatherings, with friends and colleagues and strangers. Also, big issues such as trash and recycling are intimately tied to other big issues such as economic growth, globalisation and climate change. So, as I wrote about the experiment on my blog, what began as a discussion of trash and consumption quickly became a discussion of governance, economy, peace and pillage of the Earth, poverty, the limits of human knowledge, complexity and simplicity. It was much harder to explain all that than it would have been simply to announce myself as a vegetarian, for instance.

Sometimes I failed, and a few sceptics wrote me off as a tree-hugger. But I think such remarks are an easy way to deflect tough questions about how to live more gently on Earth. To reduce our environmental footprint, we need to know how to make full use of the investments we have already made in material objects. We need to know how to take the most advantage of our ever-increasing body of scientific, technological and social knowledge to create an economy based on reduced consumption. We need to talk more about how collective change is possible by experimentation in our individual lives.

More often, though, people gave me their support. The experiment inspired others to undertake similar experiments on their own for a week or a month. A couple of friends – one in China and her brother in Ann Arbor – are now doing it for a year. Admittedly, my effort found both a receptive audience and a useful infrastructure in Ann Arbor, one of America’s most environmentally conscious cites. I could get pretty much all of my food unpackaged, and there were several great secondhand stores if I really needed something – shops where the shoes didn’t come in boxes and the tools weren’t wrapped in protective plastic casing. I recognise that not everybody has the level of control over their lives that I do, enjoys the privileges I do or lives in the kinds of places I have. I know that I am a bit of an outlier.

But anyone can reduce their consumption. What are the social and economic infrastructures available to you that you aren’t using? What waste is so ingrained in your routine that it is invisible? In focusing on my choices through trash, I was able to highlight things beyond my immediate control. While the experiment was in small part about saying no to something because of the packaging or materials, it was more broadly about saying no to what was inside that packaging – and all the environmental destruction, sweatshop labour and other harmful practices that go into things.

Humans have caused daunting problems: The polar ice caps are melting, a manmade mass extinction is underway, the oceans are full of trash, surface mines are tearing up the countryside, and indigenous people’s cultures are eroding thanks to global commerce. My project did not reshape those trends. Its effect on the trash and recycling produced in the United States was insignificant. But those conversations I had about materialism, consumerism and social change had an impact, albeit a hard-to-measure one. It also ameliorated my sense of complicity; it allowed me to attempt to answer the question of how we – as privileged individuals – stand up in the face of large problems to create examples and communities of change.

I didn’t even have to become a recluse. Rather, my quality of life improved. I learned to be more present in my choices, and I learned what is important to me, regardless of what others think. We don’t have to go back in time to heed environmental boundaries. We just have to be creative. What began as a one-year experiment ultimately lasted 2 1/2 years, the rest of my time in Ann Arbor. I still have with me the single bag for all 30 months’ worth of rubbish and recycling.

Standing in my kitchen in Washington, I think about the waste I generate now, in a city that doesn’t have the same infrastructure that Ann Arbor has. While many great facilities exist in this city, it is much larger and less dense, and so rounding up all the ingredients for a rubbish- and recycling-free life requires longer trips by foot or bike. I’ve fallen short of my Michigan strictures: It has been more than six weeks since I moved here, but my six litre rubbish and recycling bins are both full already. It’s time for me to go to the chute to send these materials to a landfill and a reprocessing facility. It’s not like I’m a profligate consumer today, but I can’t say it doesn’t hurt.

Karwat is an AAAS science and technology policy fellow at the Department of Energy and a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Michigan.

Comments Off on Goodbye, toilet paper: My experiment in generating no rubbish

Halloween costumes to die for

Written by admin on  Categories: 南京夜网

Nothing beats the undead for Halloween horror fun. Read onfor some fiendishly fun costume ideas for your best Halloween ever.
南京夜网

Zombie is still the bomb A few well placed gapping wounds will make you a truly terrifying zombie.

Still hugely popular is the zombie. This look iseasy to create with a bit of make-up and the truly great thing is it goes with any outfit. Be a zombie nurse,policeman or librarian for that matter.

The look is pale and sickly (think grey and pale-green face paint) and then add some fresh bite marks, bruises and plenty of rotting wounds around the body. Ripped clothes with wounds showing through work a treat and remember, the gorier the better.

See how to get the zombie look here

Vampires rule Vampires as still all the rage and easy to emulate.

Really who would be a hairy stinky werewolf?

Let’s just say Twilight still has a lot to answer for. Vampires are cool and can be hot if you get the balance between scary and sexy right.You will need tons of fake blood with, false fangs and lots of dark clothing. Use dramatic make-up to finish off the look.

Vampires are technically dead so make sure you go pale on the face. If really adventurous you could lighten your eyes with contacts for the spookiest effect. Then let rip with lots of dramatic dark make-up around the eyes to make them really stand out.

Dressing up as a vampire can be as easy or as complex as you like.

Skeleton crew Skeletons never go out of style.

With some careful white and black work you can transform your face into that of a skeleton. Take it further with a full body suit or just don some skeleton gloves.

A great idea for couples is the skeleton horror bride and groom. A match made in hell.

The lovely couple.

Day of the dead or Dia de los MuertosIt’s pretty and it’s creepy – got to love that.

The Day of the Dead is celebrated throughout Mexico and the Catholic world… Italy, Spain, South America and the Philippines all celebrate All Souls and All Saints Day on November 1st and 2nd.

Pretty and a little bit creepy.

Start with a whited out face. Next add the black around eyes, the end of the nose and lips. Add some black swirls and maybe stiches to the lips. Now it’s time to add the pretty. Lots of colour works well with the black and white.

Try a flower, heart or fan in the middle of your forehead or on the chin. Place another circle of colour around the black of the eyes and add several different coloured circles all the way around. Lots of pretty flowers to frame your face and for more colour can be added.

Halloween costumes to die for TweetFacebookSnakes alive Medusa’s look is easy to acheive with a greenish skin tinge, black lips and lots of rubber snakes.

Let your creativity go wild with a look straight out of Greek Mythology. Priestess Athena turned Medusa into this monster withhairof venomous snakes, eyes that wereblood-shot, furious orbs,and skin that assumed a loathsome greenish tinge. Perfect for Halloween.

Movies inspirations

The Exorcist

Photo Graham Tidy, Getty Images.

Reagan from The Exorcist is still arguably the scariest character created on screen. There are some great YouTube videos on the web on how to apply professional Exorcist make-up. Make sure you get the cuts just right, the sunken, eye sockets and the dry lips. Some light coloured contacts will also work a treat as will a green, slimey vomit like substance which can be spilled down the front of your light coloured nightdress.

Maleficent

Image supplied

Maleficent is easily identifiable with her chiseled cheekbones and black horned turban like headwear. Draped in black, she is also recognisable for a satin band around her neckand some black wing like protrusions from the base of her throat.

The Corpse Bride

Emily, the corpse bride is another great character from cinema that will make an outstanding costume for Halloween. Again there is some distinctive make-up work you can do for this character that will have you looking like a dead bride in no time. See this YouTube video to show you how.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 南京夜网.

Comments Off on Halloween costumes to die for